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Ian from Xtreme 4x4's designs Ian shares his designs with us from his hit TV show Xtreme 4x4


Ian from Xtreme 4x4's designs Ian shares his designs with us from his hit TV show Xtreme 4x4

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  #1  
Old 08-20-2010, 10:24 PM
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Mig 101 episode question

I was watching the Xtreme Mig 101 episode and was curious about the sheilding gas blend comment. I think Ian said he prefers the 90/10 mix versus the traditional 75/25.

Can anyone tell me what the benifit of this blend would be over the 75/25?

Thanks.
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Old 08-21-2010, 12:22 AM
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more CO2 burns hotter and penetrates more like ARC... the trade off is spatter, so I guess it prolly spatters a smidgeoun less than strait CO2 but burns real close to it...

just a guess.
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Old 08-21-2010, 02:06 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Sarcastro View Post
more CO2 burns hotter and penetrates more like ARC... the trade off is spatter, so I guess it prolly spatters a smidgeoun less than strait CO2 but burns real close to it...

just a guess.
Ive always learned it to be the opposite. Books and hands on co2=cold Argon=hot 75-25= mid range. 75-25 is 75% Argon and 25% co2. So if Ian prefers 90-10 he likes it a bit hotter? just a guess. Now that im getting the book out again for the second night in a row Im finding that its contradicting its self numerous times on this subject. From what I have done hands on the best looking hard wire mig weld is completed in spray transfer. When compared to globular transfer, spray is considerably hotter, uniform, smooth, virtually spatterless on cleaned/prepared metal, and nearly silent once puddle has formed. A high percentage of argon must be used along with higher voltage to make the transition from globular to spray transfer. With all the benefits of spray transfer maybe he knows about it and uses it but didn't want to get into the technicals of the method but did mention that he likes 90-10 shielding gas because it will do both. But then again maybe im overthinking it.
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Old 08-21-2010, 04:10 PM
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Normally spray transfer is really high energy probably not suited to .125 tube.
More than likely has more to do with the crispness of the arc.
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Old 08-21-2010, 05:58 PM
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That could be too. I have no problem in welding .125 tube or sheet in spray though.
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Old 08-21-2010, 09:34 PM
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I find the weld a little "cleaner" with the 90/10, the spatter is lot less, I will break out pure co2 if I am building something utilitarian like a trailer....and the appearance of the steel around the weld is not as critical and wont be powder coated or painted.
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Old 08-21-2010, 10:32 PM
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Thanks the replies.

Maybe I'll give the 90-10 a try next time I refill my bottle. I'm at the point where I'm comfortable with the functional quality of my welds, but would love to get them to look a little more refined. They don't look "bad" now, but they sure don'e look like some of the welds I see on here yet.

Thanks again.
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Old 10-10-2010, 01:56 PM
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I'm a complete amateur but I tried it on my next fill up after seeing that episode and I noticed a difference. Much less spatter. Only problem was my dealer didn't have the correct transport stickers for the 90-10.
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Old 10-10-2010, 06:38 PM
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Red face

I think some times these blended gases are just hype from the gas vendor.

Now granted there is a place for these gases.

Talking in person with several sales people in the welding gas business it is like beer some people like different brands.

I remember back in the seventies 98 % Argon and 2% was the hot set up for carbon steel GMAW
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Old 10-13-2010, 01:31 PM
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I'm a novice welder so I can't speak from experience, but the pro welders in my shop at work like 90/10 more also. According to them it's hotter and spatters less. I had a hard time getting it in a small bottle for my home welder, though. I used our shop's supplier (OE Meyer) and they could only give me 70/30 in a 20cf bottle.
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Old 10-21-2012, 09:51 PM
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If you are working on some cleaner tubing and want to minimize spatter...I have used products like this....it does really work well.

http://www.tractorsupply.com/mig-wel...16-oz--3895399
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