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Welders and Welding Which welder is best and the best way's to use them.


Welders and Welding Which welder is best and the best way's to use them.

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  #41  
Old 11-20-2017, 06:48 PM
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Oh how I wish. Teenagers can be a handful. Heís doing good in school so thatís good. Anyway, looking forward to seeing the completed narrowed axle assy. bolted up under the Nova.
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  #42  
Old 12-04-2017, 02:46 PM
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Okay so at your advice I looked over my welds closely and decided I will rework them. Here is a video to get a closer 360 view of each. I noticed the first inch or so of each weld is cold and then starts to wet out more. The cold parts of the welds and questionable overlaps at the ends are what motivated me to rework.

Youtube Video - Old Welds

https://youtu.be/y7PC6gEBxSo


In retrospect I think I would have had better results if I preheated the housing, but even so I think the starts and stops and time to re-position the housing between welds were the main contributing factors to the result. So I decided to enlist my kids to help me make a rotisserie. Here's what we came up with:











The rotisserie we came up with is a simple set of stands made from 4x6 and 3/4 plywood remnants with opposing chair casters on top. Fixed wheels might work better, but I had these on hand. I'm hopeful they are far enough from welding heat that they won't melt. I bolted a pair of heavy steel lift/lowering blocks to the diff cover to balance it and formed a crank handle from a piece of scrap aluminum. Here's a video of it in action.

Youtube Video - Rear Axle Housing Rotisserie

https://youtu.be/h0cS8J92NiQ


I'm happy with how it works; it rotates smoothly and feels balanced enough that I can stop at any position and the axle housing doesn't try to swing around on me. My plan is to crank the housing around with my left hand while I weld with my right (I'm right-handed). I'll try to position an arm rest to keep my welding hand steady. I thought about trying to power it with a drill or something to get a consistent feed rate, but I'm not sure if I could adjust the speed quickly enough whereas with a hand crank I can adjust as I go. What do you think?

I ground out the old welds with a 4-1/2 grinder. Here is what they look like. There is a bit of a radius inside the corner due to how the grinding wheel wore on edge. Should I get a fresh wheel and try to reduce that radius to form more of a sharp inside corner before welding?

Youtube Video - Ground down housing end welds

https://youtu.be/skACc_e_Dag
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Last edited by TheBandit; 12-04-2017 at 03:17 PM.
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  #43  
Old 12-04-2017, 04:39 PM
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Nice simple fixture. Could you rig up something with a belt and your drill to power it while you weld???
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  #44  
Old 12-05-2017, 03:16 PM
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Nice simple fixture. Could you rig up something with a belt and your drill to power it while you weld???
All that is needed to automate the rotation is a bit of rope:
Tape it to the axle tube and then wind the tube the opposite direction from the rotation you want about 8 or so times, then put a loop in the free end that you can get yer foot into and step down the tube will rotate and you have the control of it in your foot.
You could also attach the rope to a 1x2 (or) and set one end on the floor while the other is the distance that = to the Dia of the tube so that stepping down on the stick rotates the housing one full rev.
Now you have one hand running the MIG one foot running the rope turner.
Can you chew gum
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  #45  
Old 12-06-2017, 02:10 PM
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I am not nearly coordinated enough for that! If I'm going to automate it I need to find something with a dial-set speed like the table feed on a mill.
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  #46  
Old 12-06-2017, 02:32 PM
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My take is the hand control and a fixture to hold the mig gun will be the best.

If you don't have allot of weld positioner experience it's going to be allot of work for nothing to power it. I used my mill rotary table one time with a vs drill and it was pretty hard to control.
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  #47  
Old 12-06-2017, 02:52 PM
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I am not nearly coordinated enough for that! If I'm going to automate it I need to find something with a dial-set speed like the table feed on a mill.
Got a buddy that welds?
If so she/he can watch what you are doing and spin the tube as necessary.

Edit:
Without the welder, you really should try the rope on a stick, you may be surprised at the ease of it and it wont cost much if anything to try
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Last edited by entropy; 12-06-2017 at 02:56 PM.
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  #48  
Old 12-06-2017, 03:35 PM
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My take is the hand control and a fixture to hold the mig gun will be the best.
Are you suggesting to fix the mig gun in place? I was thinking a rest so I can still weave the gun back and forth between the housing and the housing end.

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Originally Posted by entropy View Post
Got a buddy that welds?
Only you guys. In my local circles I am the buddy that "welds".
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Last edited by TheBandit; 12-06-2017 at 03:38 PM.
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  #49  
Old 12-06-2017, 06:03 PM
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Only you guys. In my local circles I am the buddy that "welds".
Oh, You are that guy
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  #50  
Old 12-06-2017, 10:57 PM
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Originally Posted by TheBandit View Post
Are you suggesting to fix the mig gun in place? I was thinking a rest so I can still weave the gun back and forth between the housing and the housing end.



Only you guys. In my local circles I am the buddy that "welds".
Yeh my bad glad you asked. A rest for the gooseneck would be awesome, let you focus on the axle spinning.
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  #51  
Old 12-07-2017, 02:49 PM
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Oh, You are that guy
Yes. Where do think they find all these "you're not a welder when" photos?
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  #52  
Old 01-02-2018, 01:48 PM
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This has been quite a refresher on welding (and grinding lol) for me. After getting the rotisserie figured out, I got everything setup on my welding table and proceeded on a second pass at welding this. Here is a video:


https://youtu.be/3Jf7DU67A7E


Unfortunately that attempt was ill-fated. The resulting weld was a narrow, piled-up glob-ring around the housing that I dared not photograph (the grinder came out faster than John Force). I walked away from the project for a few days while I pondered what went wrong. I talked to my brother who is more of a doer/fabricator than an over-thinker/engineer like me, and together we came up with a few conclusions:

First, the overall height of my welding table and the rotisserie stands put the housing too high - roughly armpit level - and instead of positioning the gun over the housing for a flat position weld, I had the gun on the side of the housing doing a vertical position weld. Second, the hand crank was large so I ended up positioning my head behind the nozzle where my view of the weld was obstructed (this also contributed to doing a vertical position weld). Third, I was pushing the weld and given I was looking at the front side of the weld and had obstructed view of the back, I didn't even notice the weld pilling up behind the gun. Fourth, I wasn't weaving nearly enough.

Those factors all contributed to a bad result so I set out on a plan to right my wrongs. First I put the rear end all the way down on the floor instead of up too high on the welding table. As a result I had to kneel on the floor to make the weld, but I was able to more easily do a flat position weld which would help the weld lay flat and wide instead of narrow and built-up. Second, I shortened my hand crank to essentially just stick out from where the bolt of the housing end would normally go. This made it harder to crank, but freed space so I could put my body in front of the housing end and get my head closer to see what I was doing. Third, I switched from a "pushing" technique to a "pulling" technique by rotating the housing in the opposite direction, angling the gun slightly from vertical toward the direction of welding, and viewing the weld from the back of the puddle. I placed a jack stand as close to the housing as I could to use as a hand rest and did a dry run. Here is a video (ignore my muttering):


https://youtu.be/oFxGp53rx4Y


The dry run went well. I had to adjust my position a little to get angle on the gun and visibility while the spring perch swung around, but for the most part this worked. Time to weld. This time I made a wider weave and I paused momentarily at each end of the weave.


https://youtu.be/7P_RI_gJ_Gg


That worked out quite well. The first side went smoothly and I got a flatter, continuous bead all the way around the housing. While welding the second side I had to stop and restart twice, first because my hand crank got caught in my welding apron (Murphy's law) and second because I accidentally dipped the tip into the weld. But I corrected those issues pretty quickly and the start-stops are not too noticeable. Here are a couple photos showing the finished welds:





I am happy with those results. They are a little built-up and could probably have wetted out more at the housing tube side, but I think they'll be just fine. The only thing I'm missing now is triangulation.
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Last edited by TheBandit; 01-02-2018 at 02:00 PM.
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  #53  
Old 01-02-2018, 04:51 PM
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Kewel!
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  #54  
Old 01-03-2018, 09:33 AM
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I didn't comment originally because I'm far from a MIG welding expert. Those welds look good, on to putting it back together?
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  #55  
Old 01-03-2018, 11:59 AM
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I didn't comment originally because I'm far from a MIG welding expert. Those welds look good, on to putting it back together?
Just about. I want to mock up the axles and put some tabs on for the brake lines.

I'm on the fence about painting or powder coat. If I paint it it will be easier to add tabs and things and just spray touch-up later if I decide to link it, but powder coat would be more durable.
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Old 01-03-2018, 01:08 PM
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My advice on paint vs. powder is to wait on powder until you're pretty sure you're done. Sounds like you're on the fence, so I would paint. I've ground, burned, and stripped enough powder to cure me of wanting to apply it to anything...
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  #57  
Old 01-03-2018, 03:31 PM
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Originally Posted by TheBandit View Post
Just about. I want to mock up the axles and put some tabs on for the brake lines.

I'm on the fence about painting or powder coat. If I paint it it will be easier to add tabs and things and just spray touch-up later if I decide to link it, but powder coat would be more durable.
I admit that I haven't built a looker in a while but I do have a bird to get into.
..based on this perspective I cant justify powder coat for a thingy that is under the car never to be seen and will last forever in your environment without even paint.
Just paint it
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  #58  
Old 01-03-2018, 03:52 PM
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Y'all make some great points. I agree. Thank you!
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  #59  
Old 01-04-2018, 12:12 AM
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When you add brackets to hold the brake lines, use the ones that are a "C" that allows you to pull the clip and pull the line out a little without opening up the brake lines. I didn't. Now I need to weld on my control arms and the brake line is right there, 1/4" from the weld area.
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  #60  
Old 01-04-2018, 08:00 PM
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love the homemade jig things.i'm the guy that will make those things in a few hours instead of buying them down the street for cheap.just because it's fun.and more fun when the kids are involved.
welds turn out nice,good coordination on the turning/welding/looking thing.
hate to bring this up,but,what do the inside of the tube welds look like.

sorry to ask
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